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Criminal Justice Courses: 44 credit hours

CRMJ.100 Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course approaches the criminal justice system from a historical, developmental, and philosophical perspective. Included are the independent and interdependent relationships that exist between the components of the system, as well as its connection with and impact on society.

CRMJ.126 Ethics in Criminal Justice

This course provides a strong theoretical foundation for solving ethical dilemmas in the field of criminal justice. Students will gain a realistic picture not only of what ethical questions arise, but also how sound moral decisions are made in response to them. Prerequisite: CRMJ.100

CRMJ.130 Corrections

This course provides students with an overview of the corrections system including historical development, philosophy, and a variety of correctional methods. Pre- and post-institutional techniques, probation, and parole will be covered. Prerequisite: CRMJ.100

CRMJ.140 Juvenile Justice Administration

This course reviews the nature and extent of juvenile delinquency in our society, focusing on the progressive development of the juvenile justice system and its interaction with other components of the criminal justice system. The course also includes a study of the Illinois juvenile justice statutes. Prerequisite: CRMJ.100

CRMJ.150 Police Operations

An introduction to the aspects of policing as a functional component of the criminal justice system. Students will learn law enforcement history, police practices, and related issues and concepts of contemporary law enforcement. Prerequisite: CRMJ.100

CRMJ.220 Crisis and Conflict Intervention

This course presents the social and psychological factors found in crisis situations such as family violence, homicide, chemical and sexual abuse, suicide, physical illness, injuries, and other forms of interpersonal conflicts and violence. Students will develop strategies for professional assessment, intervention, and follow-up in these situations. Prerequisite: CRMJ.100

CRMJ.230 Criminal Law

The primary focus of this course is developing an understanding of the types of conduct that are defined as criminal by both statutory and common law. The goal is a recognition that the development of criminal law is premised on the fundamental underlying tension between society's need to control behavior and the personal liberty interest of individuals. Prerequisite: CRMJ.100

CRMJ.240 Criminal Procedure

This course covers constitutional and statutory guidelines for arrest, detention, use of force, search and seizure, warrant requirements, lineups and identification procedures, confessions, admissions, and interrogations. Emphasis is on the procedural considerations affecting law enforcement actions as restricted by the constitution, statutes, and case law. Illinois criminal procedure is also covered. Prerequisite: CRMJ.100

CRMJ.250 Criminal Investigations

This course covers the fundamentals and procedures of investigations, applications of deductive and inductive reasoning in the investigative process, collection, marking and preservation of evidence, and the techniques and procedures of follow-up investigations. Prerequisite: CRMJ.100

CRMJ.260 Criminology

This course covers the nature of crime and delinquency based on historical and conventional theories of causation. Also presented is the interrelationship between punishment, solution, and correction. Prerequisite: CRMJ.100

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Related Courses: 12 credit hours

HUMN.210 Introduction to Logic & Critical Thinking

A study of the rules of valid judging and reasoning, both inductive and deductive, in a traditional language centered context rather than a symbolic context. Logical analysis of both formal and informal fallacies and of the consistency and logical consequences of a given set of statements is applied to concrete problems. A research project is required. Prerequisite: ENGL.100 and COLL.100

SOCS.200 Introduction to Psychology

An exploration of different methods, principles, and theories of psychology as applied to the study of human behavior, motivation, emotions, personality and adjustment, and psychological disorders. A research project is required. Prerequisite: ENGL.100 and COLL.100

SOCS.220 Cultural Diversity

The social organization and customs of various cultures and groups will be explored. The richness and diversity of Chicago and surrounding areas are experienced through music, literature, video/film, and field trips to historical and cultural sites and neighborhoods. A research project is required. Prerequisite: ENGL.100 and COLL.100

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General Education Courses: 34 credit hours

ENGL.100 Composition

This course emphasizes the development and organization of expository prose through the writing of short and long compositions. Critical thinking, public speaking, and research skills are also introduced so that these skills may be applied throughout the curriculum. Students do peer editing of projects in collaborative groups. Prerequisite: Successful completion of or exemption from ENGL.095

COMM.110 Introduction to Communication

This course will introduce students to basic models and theories of the communication process. Students will learn about a variety of elements involved in communication. They will also explore how factors such as race, ethnicity, age, socio-economic status, and gender influence communication. Students will focus on developing an awareness of the effects of various types of communication on themselves and others. They will also develop practical skills for improving their ability to communicate in personal, social, and professional contexts. Specific topics will include perception, self-concept, verbal and nonverbal communication, effective listening and communicating in culturally diverse settings. This course is only available to students completing of their degree online. Prerequisite: ENGL.100 and COLL.100

ENGL.120 Advanced Composition

Skills learned in the first composition course are reinforced and amplified through more complex writing projects. Students continue to develop independence in preparing and organizing written materials through peer editing. Specific attention is given to the process of finding and working with information from a variety of sources in order to write a 10-15 page research paper. Assignments completed outside of class are required to be submitted in typed final form. Prerequisite: ENGL.100 and COLL.100

COMM.200 Business Communications

A capstone course that furthers each student's ability to communicate in business situations. Students enhance their writing styles by reviewing key concepts and by producing a variety of written communications including letters, memos, minutes, and short reports. Peer collaboration and oral presentations are required. Prerequisites: COMM.100, ENGL.120 and COLL.100

COMM.200 Business Communications

A capstone course that furthers each student's ability to communicate in business situations. Students enhance their writing styles by reviewing key concepts and by producing a variety of written communications including letters, memos, minutes, and short reports. Peer collaboration and oral presentations are required. Prerequisites: COMM.100, ENGL.120 and COLL.100

MATH.112 College Mathematics

Students develop their ability to use mathematical reasoning to solve real-life problems by engaging in the following topics: algebra, set theory and number theory, units of measurement and geometry, probability and statistics, ratios and proportions. The objective of this course is to prepare students for the sort of math necessary for success in their chosen area of study and to provide preparation for successfully completing a course in college algebra. Prerequisite: Placement examination or successful completion of MATH.095

CPTR.100 Introduction to Computer Information Systems

This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the computer and its current role in business and society. Topics include components of a computer including hardware, software, and operating systems. Students get actual hands-on experience with commonly used software applications in database management, spreadsheets, and word processing and the Windows operating system. Out-of-class laboratory time is required.

COLL.100 Freshman Seminar

Students are introduced to concepts and practices that lead to individual academic and career success. It is required of all students in their first quarter unless they have a bachelor's degree, an associate degree, or have completed at least 30 semester credit hours or 45 quarter credit hours of college-level coursework with a 2.5 GPA or higher. Co

COLL.290 Professional Development

This course assists students in developing successful job search techniques to help them prepare for initial employment as well as career advancement or change. Professional self-image, ethics, human relations, employer expectations, and communication skills are addressed. Students prepare a resume and participate in a mock interview. Required for all students. Prerequisite: 70 completed hours

SOCS.210 Introduction to Sociology

A general introduction to the study of society and concepts involved in understanding human societies. Social institutions, social interaction, social conflict, social stratification, and diversity are among the topics covered. A research project is required. Prerequisite: ENGL.100 and COLL.100

HUMN.200 Ethics

Students analyze the moral and ethical principles of human conduct and character, including the nature of morality, the meaning of ethical terms, and standards for evaluating choices. These theories are applied to moral problems and decisions. A research project is required. Prerequisite: ENGL.100 and COLL.100

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Electives: 10 credit hours